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Best Science podcasts we could find (updated January 2020)
Best Science podcasts we could find
Updated January 2020
People's thirst for knowledge and exploring the unknown is responsible for the development of our civilisation. New breakthroughs are announced on a daily basis and new planets are discovered, which might be difficult to follow. Podcasts can help you expand your gray matter and learn new facts, regardless of how busy you are as they are portable, easy to follow from any location, most of them free. Thanks to podcasts, people can fetch the latest science news and be among the first ones to find out about the latest breakthroughs, planets, and the latest research results. In this catalog you can find podcasts which cover all aspects of science, ranging from the tiniest microbes in our bodies to the outer reaches of space. There are podcasts where people can learn more about the mysteries which still puzzle us all, accompanied by people who devote their lives to solving them. Some podcasts cover interviews with the world's top scientists, answers to people's science questions and offer safe science experiments to try at home.
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View the Episode Archive »Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes | RSS.#smartbinge Radiolab podcasts
 
Brain fun for curious people.
 
Deep in the back of your mind, you’ve always had the feeling that there’s something strange about reality. There is. Join Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick as they examine neurological quandaries, cosmic mysteries, evolutionary marvels and our transhuman future.
 
Science news and highlights of the week
 
Witty, irreverent look at the world through scientists' eyes. With Brian Cox and Robin Ince.
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
The Naked Scientists flagship science show brings you a lighthearted look at the latest scientific breakthroughs, interviews with the world's top scientists, answers to your science questions and science experiments to try at home.
 
Whether the topic is popcorn or particle physics, you can count on BrainStuff to explore -- and explain -- the everyday science in the world around us.
 
There are a lot of fads, blogs and strong opinions, but then there’s SCIENCE. Science Vs is the show from Gimlet Media that finds out what’s fact, what’s not, and what’s somewhere in between. We do the hard work of sifting through all the science so you don't have to. This season we tackle football concussions, heartbreak, 5G networks, sleep, free healthcare, police use of force, asteroids and more.
 
The kickass science and technology radio show that delivers an irreverent look at the week in science and technology.
 
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.
 
Dr Adam Rutherford and guests illuminate the mysteries and challenge the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.
 
Explorations in the world of science.
 
The Science Show gives Australians unique insights into the latest scientific research and debate, from the physics of cricket to prime ministerial biorhythms.
 
Science sleuths Dr Adam Rutherford and Dr Hannah Fry investigate everyday mysteries sent by listeners.
 
Brains On!® is a science podcast for curious kids and adults from American Public Media. Co-hosted each week by kid scientists and reporters from public radio, we ask questions ranging from the science behind sneezing to how to translate the purr of cats, and go wherever the answers take us. @Brains_On
 
The BBC brings you all the week's science news.
 
The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
The award-winning Science Weekly podcast is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics – and sometimes even maths. Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology. Science has never sounded so good! We'd love to hear what you think, so get in touch via @guardianaudio or podcasts@theguardian.com
 
Science journalist Wendy Zukerman dissects the latest fad framing itself as scientific fact, wading through the mass of information so you don't have to.
 
5 Live's science podcast, featuring Dr Karl, plus Dr Chris and Naked Scientists with the hottest science news stories and analysis.
 
Whether we wear a lab coat or haven't seen a test tube since grade school, science is shaping all of our lives. And that means we all have science stories to tell. Every year, we host dozens of live shows all over the country, featuring all kinds of storytellers - researchers, doctors, and engineers of course, but also patients, poets, comedians, cops, and more. Some of our stories are heartbreaking, others are hilarious, but they're all true and all very personal. Welcome to The Story Collider!
 
Professor Jim Al-Khalili talks to leading scientists about their life and work, finding out what inspires them and asking what their discoveries might do for us in the future.
 
Join Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, Linda Marigliano and their scientific guests, with a bunch of curious triple j listeners for a weekly injection of science, myth-bashing and answers!
 
Hosts Mindy Thomas and Guy Raz guide curious kids and their grown-ups on a journey into the wonders of the world around them. We'll go inside our brains, out into space and deep into the coolest new stories in science and technology.
 
Exploring stories of science discovery. Tumble is a science podcast created to be enjoyed by the entire family. Hosted & produced by Lindsay Patterson (science journalist) & Marshall Escamilla (teacher). Visit www.tumblepodcast.com for more information and educational content.
 
Volcanoes. Trees. Drunk butterflies. Mars missions. Slug sex. Death. Beauty standards. Anxiety busters. Beer science. Bee drama. Take away a pocket full of science knowledge and charming, bizarre stories about what fuels these professional -ologists' obsessions. Humorist and science correspondent Alie Ward asks smart people stupid questions and the answers might change your life.
 
Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
Scientific principles, theory, and the role of key figures in the advancement of science.
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
The surprising connections in science and technology that give you the Big Picture. Astronomer Seth Shostak and science journalist Molly Bentley are joined each week by leading researchers, techies, and journalists to provide a smart and humorous take on science. Our regular "Skeptic Check" episodes cast a critical eye on pseudoscience.
 
[We have episodes in German and English] How do scientists uncover phenomena and explain their connections? How do engineers design machines, methods and infrastructure? At omega tau, experts give detailed answers. Over the last ten years, we have produced 300 episodes in which we dug deeper, until we ran out of questions. Join us on our journey through the world of science and engineering: the closer you look and listen, the more interesting things get.
 
We take your questions about life, Earth and the universe to researchers hunting for answers at the frontiers of knowledge.
 
A fun-filled discussion of the big, mind-blowing, unanswered questions about the Universe. In each episode, Daniel Whiteson (a Physicist who works at CERN) and Jorge Cham (a popular online cartoonist) discuss some of the simple but profound questions that people have been wondering about for thousands of years, explaining the science in a fun, shorts-wearing and jargon-free way.
 
In this podcast I discuss a variety of topics in both the natural and social sciences, exploring the many fascinating insights that the scientific method yields about the world around us.
 
"I’m Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of StarTalk Radio. I’ve recruited a crack team of scientists and science educators to help me bring the universe down to Earth. They are… The StarTalk All-Stars." New episodes premiere Tuesday nights at 7pm ET.
 
From the ground breaking and life saving to the wacky and implausible, Dr Karl Kruszelnicki reveals some of the best moments in science.
 
Get in-depth science coverage at WIRED including news, the latest research and discoveries and how technology is shaping the world of science. A SpokenEdition transforms written content into human-read audio you can listen to anywhere. It's perfect for times when you can't read - while driving, at the gym, doing chores, etc. Find more at www.spokenedition.com
 
How many organs could you donate and remain alive? How many planet Earths could fit inside the Sun? How high is a giraffe's blood pressure? Why is the sea blue? To find out, Ask The Naked Scientists!
 
Cara Santa Maria is a science communicator, television host, producer, and journalist. She is excited to present "Talk Nerdy," a place for conversations with interesting people about interesting topics.
 
Want TED Talks on the go? Every weekday, this feed brings you our latest talks in audio format. Hear thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable -- from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between -- given by the world's leading thinkers and doers. This collection of talks, given at TED and TEDx conferences around the globe, is also available in video format.
 
You might think you know what it takes to lead a happier life… more money, a better job, or Instagram-worthy vacations. You’re dead wrong. Yale professor Dr. Laurie Santos has studied the science of happiness and found that many of us do the exact opposite of what will truly make our lives better. Based on the psychology course she teaches at Yale--the most popular class in the university’s 300-year history--Laurie will take you through the latest scientific research and share some surprisin ...
 
A podcast about the left turns, missteps, and lucky breaks that make science happen.
 
Bill Nye is on a mission to change the world— one phone call at a time. He’ll tackle your curliest questions on just about anything in the universe. Give him a call! Perhaps you’ve wondered: Should I stop eating cheeseburgers to combat climate change? How often should I really be washing my pillowcase? Can I harvest energy from all those static-electricity shocks I get in the winter? With a little help from his co-host Corey S. Powell, field experts, and special celebrity guests, Bill will a ...
 
NOVA brings you short audio stories from the world of science -- anything from hurricanes to mummies to neutrinos. For more science programming online and on air, visit NOVA's Web site at pbs.org/nova, or watch NOVA broadcasts Wednesday nights on PBS.
 
Are you searching for great stories to ignite your curiosity, teach you to perform better in life and career, inspire your mind, and make you laugh along the way? In this science podcast, Dr. Marie McNeely introduces you to the brilliant researchers behind the latest scientific discoveries. Join us as they share their greatest failures, most staggering successes, candid career advice, and what drives them forward in life and science. Our website with show notes]] Greetings science fans! We’r ...
 
View the Episode Archive »Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes | RSS.#smartbinge Radiolab podcasts
 
Science, culture and everything in between. Feel the heat. All species welcome.
 
From agriculture to the X-ray machine, Stuff to Blow Your Mind hosts Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick explore the inventions we created, and how they created us.
 
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Some wolf pups will play fetch with a stranger, suggesting that an ability to playfully interact with people could have come before, and played a role in, dog domestication.By Karen Hopkin
 
Some wolf pups will play fetch with a stranger, suggesting that an ability to playfully interact with people could have come before, and played a role in, dog domestication. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Edwin Hubble is world famous for his discoveries. Henrietta Swan Leavitt is not. Henrietta was on a team that found a way to measure and classify the universe. They were employed as "human computers" (before the machines existed). Dava's book "The Glass Universe" refers to the half million glass slides Henrietta and other women used to document bot…
 
Language may be uniquely human but communication certainly isn’t and our attempts to decipher just what is being said by our animal cousins often brings up more questions than it does answers.One particularly mysterious finding is that all Whales everywhere seem to have made the collective decision to stop shouting and start whispering.Why? Dr. Emm…
 
You’ve heard of fracking, and you’re pretty sure lots of people don’t like it, but do you know what it really entails? Learn what goes into the fracking process in this classic episode of BrainStuff. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Dan is joined in the studio by scientific royalty, Lucy Hawking! He hears all about her brand new book and she answers your questions. Plus, imagine drilling deep enough into the core you can peer in?By Fun Kids
 
What if the Ark of the Covenant was actually a bronze-age machine capable of storing an electrostatic charge? It almost certainly wasn't, but the idea is a great excuse to explore the understanding of electricity in the ancient world. Join Robert and Joe for another Ark-themed episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind. Learn more about your ad-choices at …
 
By listening to the sounds of the forest, biologists were able to identify an invasion of barred owls in spotted owl habitat. Christopher Intagliata reports.By Christopher Intagliata
 
By listening to the sounds of the forest, biologists were able to identify an invasion of barred owls in spotted owl habitat. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Conservator Rachel Sabino from the Art Institute of Chicago describes the methods used by some to deceive and how technology helps expose fake art objects.
 
Geoff Taylor was about to leave Exmouth Western Australia when film maker Elizabeth Parr-Cook rang and asked if he would like to film whale sharks for a television nature film. Geoff stayed in Exmouth and went on to capture exquisite footage of whale sharks on Ningaloo Reef.
 
Prior to 1991, there were no protocols for the handling and disposal of waste and hazardous material in Antarctica. Now two scientists are remediating polluted sites.
 
While some scientists try to engineer processes to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, seagrasses and mangroves do it for free.
 
Rising seas and immovable roads and buildings is putting a squeeze on beaches. Erosion is increasing and beaches are becoming narrower.
 
Actor Ben Lawson shares his pain following recent bushfires in this emotional video posted on Facebook.
 
Roger Penrose is arguably the most important living descendent of Albert Einstein’s school of geometric physics. In this episode of The Portal, we avoid the usual questions put to roger about quantum foundations and quantum consciousness. Instead we go back to ask about the current status of his thinking on what would have been called “Unified Fiel…
 
Patricia Marcoccia and Maziar Ghaderi of Holding Space Films talk to Jonathan kay about the time they spent chronicling the daily life of Canada’s most famous public intellectual—and how critics on both sides reacted to The Rise of Jordan Peterson.By Quillette
 
As the Goop Lab TV series lands in Netflix accounts, Greg Foot and guests look at the scientific evidence for the therapies tried out by Goop staff, including Gwyneth Paltrow herself. Dr James Rucker, lead on the psilocybin trials at Kings College, London, talks about psychedelic therapy, and Dr Sarah Davey, Lecturer in Sport & Exercise Science, Ox…
 
A novel coronavirus—the type of virus that causes SARS, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and common cold symptoms—has killed 18 people, and sickened more than 600. In response, Chinese officials have quarantined several huge cities, where some 20 million people live. In this segment, Ira talks with epidemiologists Saskia Popescu and Ian Lip…
 
Before any new drug comes to market, it goes through a time-consuming process. Researchers have to recruit human subjects for a clinical trial, collect all the data, and analyze the results. All of that can take years to complete, but the end result could be worth it: a drug that treats a rare disease or improves patients lives with fewer side effe…
 
Super-sized volcanic eruptions and giant asteroids crashing in from outer space are the stuff of disaster movies. They have listener Santosh from South Africa slightly concerned. He’d like to know what’s being done in real life to prepare for this kind of event. Although the chance of these events occurring is low, Santosh isn’t entirely wrong to b…
 
Shane talks with Social Psychologist Shira Gabriel about watching television, social needs, and social connections. What can researching TV watching tell us about parasocial relationships with Reality TV stars and why sharing your favorite TV Series strengthens relationships. Charity Of The Week: Stitch Buffalo Please visit our sponsors: The Great …
 
When the ocean changes, the planet changes -- and it all starts with microbes, says biological oceanographer Angelicque White. Backed by decades of data, White shares how scientists use these ancient microorganisms as a crucial barometer of ocean health -- and how we might rejuvenate them as marine temperatures steadily rise.…
 
When the ocean changes, the planet changes -- and it all starts with microbes, says biological oceanographer Angelicque White. Backed by decades of data, White shares how scientists use these ancient microorganisms as a crucial barometer of ocean health -- and how we might rejuvenate them as marine temperatures steadily rise.…
 
Right now, at this very moment, all across the planet, there are 7.6 billion human beings eating, breathing, sleeping, brushing their teeth, walking their dogs, drinking coffee, walking down the street or running onto the subway or hopping in their car, maybe reading a summary of a podcast they’re about to hit play on … and the number is only going…
 
Right now, at this very moment, all across the planet, there are 7.6 billion human beings eating, breathing, sleeping, brushing their teeth, walking their dogs, drinking coffee, walking down the street or running onto the subway or hopping in their car, maybe reading a summary of a podcast they’re about to hit play on … and the number is only going…
 
Right now, at this very moment, all across the planet, there are 7.6 billion human beings eating, breathing, sleeping, brushing their teeth, walking their dogs, drinking coffee, walking down the street or running onto the subway or hopping in their car, maybe reading a summary of a podcast they’re about to hit play on … and the number is only going…
 
Bengal cats are a hybrid of domestic cats and a small, wild type of leopard cat. Learn how this breed began and why they're an intensive pet in this episode of BrainStuff. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
This week we present two stories of people struggling with what the “right” thing to do is. Part 1: Catherine Macdonald always wanted to study sharks, but her first time tagging them in the field doesn't go as planned. Part 2: When Michelle Tong visits home after her first semester of medical school, a stranger presents an ethical dilemma. Dr. Cath…
 
Say you came across someone who was lying motionless in the street would you stop and find out what happened or if they were injured in some way?Most people might like to think, and indeed say, that they would go over to help, but it turns out that if you are in a crowd or on a busy street the chances of you stopping are greatly reduced.So, why mig…
 
This week, what's the resolution of the human eye? Would nanobots be attacked by our immune systems? How small would a squash ball lump of coal be if you squished it into a diamond? Why do propellers look like they change speed, or even go backwards? And why do men's hairlines recede? Plus in the news, what's happening with this new coronavirus in …
 
Tumble has won a big award for two episodes: “The Cave of the Underground Astronauts” and “The Science of Whiskers.” You’ll hear them both in this twin pack of awesome stories of science discovery. Tumble is the 2019 Gold Award winner of the AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award, in the category of Children’s Science News. It’s an international prize…
 
A deadly virus believed to have originated in China was found in the US this week. NPR global health correspondent Jason Beaubien explains what we know and don't know about the disease — and the likelihood it will continue to spread. Follow Jason on Twitter @jasonbnpr. More of NPR's reporting on the virus can be found here. Follow host Maddie Sofia…
 
A new virus, never before seen in humans, has emerged from the city of Wuhan in China. Since the start of the outbreak, the virus has spread to more than seven countries and more than 500 people have been infected. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Ian Jones about exactly what a coronavirus is. And we hear from epidemiologist Dr Rosalind Eggo about how …
 
What can we learn from Pokemon? @Ng_Dave @OrnithoAle @jiayingzhao @satterfdubc1 @ubcires @ubcmsl @UBC #GottaLearnEmAll #GottaSaveEmAll #PhyloGame #Pokemon #EnvironmentalEducation #Sustainability #Biodiversity #ConservationBy KPCC 89.3 | Southern California Public Radio
 
Learn about how AI and Twitter could help you find the perfect job, and how the world is actually a greener place than it was 20 years ago. We’ll also answer a listener question about why we use the color “blue” to say we’re sad. Job-Matching with Your Tweets by Kelsey Donk Sources: Robot career advisor: AI may soon be able to analyse your tweets t…
 
Rutherford & Fry reveal which of your questions they’ve chosen for Series 15. Plus they select more of their favourite strange-but-true science papers, including how to use mathematics to challenge a parking fine and training tortoises to yawn.By BBC Radio 4
 
Intermittent fasting — why not eating (for a bit) could work for weight loss and health; Brewing a better espresso with less coffee and more math; Bringing biology to bricks — concrete details on how to grow building materials; Avast! Scurvy is still a health issue in 21st century Canada; Fangs very much. Scientists use stem cells to make snake ven…
 
Intermittent fasting — why not eating (for a bit) could work for weight loss and health; Brewing a better espresso with less coffee and more math; Bringing biology to bricks — concrete details on how to grow building materials; Avast! Scurvy is still a health issue in 21st century Canada; Fangs very much. Scientists use stem cells to make snake ven…
 
On Worcester Polytechnic Institute Week: Project-based learning can set students up for success outside of school. Kent Rissmiller, associate professor of social science, explores these benefits. Kent Rissmiller completed studies in political science at Muhlenberg College (AB) and Syracuse University (PhD). Along the way, he also completed a JD at …
 
As we transition to our new host Manoush Zomorodi, Guy Raz looks back on some of his favorite episodes from his seven years hosting the TED Radio Hour. This episode originally aired on June 27, 2014. When is copying flattery, when is it thievery, and when is it sheer genius? In this hour, TED speakers explore how sampling, borrowing, and riffing ma…
 
The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii boosts curiosity in mice—which makes them more likely to be caught by cats, thus continuing the parasite’s life cycle. Karen Hopkin reports.By Karen Hopkin
 
The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii boosts curiosity in mice—which makes them more likely to be caught by cats, thus continuing the parasite’s life cycle. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
It’s that time again – the virtual mail bag is overflowing, so we invited Susanna Harris of PhDBalance.com to help us answer YOUR emails, Tweets, and messages. Bringing the Heat We start with a few burning questions about applications and interviews. The first question comes from a listener who was promised a strong letter of […] The post 126: List…
 
In pursuit of a predator. A sting operation. A black list. Big law suits. Is this the biggest threat to science since the Inquisition? Science Friction's fresh season for 2020 kicks off next episode.
 
Interview w/ Dr. Moriba Jah, Cancer T Cells, Snakes And A Virus, Watery Mars Dirt, Wet Rattlesnakes, Helper Parrots, Psychoactive Mood Bump, Greying Hair?, Playful Wolf Pups, And Much More... The post 22 January, 2019 – Episode 755 – Directing Space Traffic appeared first on This Week in Science - The Kickass Science Podcast.…
 
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